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Last week the NCAA announced a rule change that will allow student athletes to financially benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness. This step is reflective of a trend toward improving support for student-athletes that is several years in the making.  With high profile student athletes having great revenue-generating potential, collegiate athletics might continue to look more and more like professional sports.  Read More ›

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In a departure from historical precedent, where courts upheld agreements requiring employees to bring claims against their employers more quickly than otherwise required by law, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (which covers Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee) has now prohibited such shortened limitation periods in discrimination lawsuits brought under the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 (also referred to as Title VII). Read More ›

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On the morning of September 20, 2012, Keith Readus was working at an automobile assembly plant when co-worker Jeffrey Hunt stabbed him to death. Hunt fled the scene and later committed suicide. Readus’s son, Keith, then sued his father’s former employer for negligently hiring/re-hiring Hunt. He alleged the employer knew about Hunt’s history of violent conduct, including “threats of physical harm against coworkers, carrying a weapon in the workplace, and being arrested and convicted after physically assaulting another individual in 1997.” Estate of Readus by Gardner v. Chrysler Grp., LLC, No. 338273, 2019 WL 637281, at *1 (Mich. Ct. App. Feb. 14, 2019). Read More ›

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The Michigan Court of Appeals recently weighed in on litigation initiated by the Feiger law firm on behalf of two women against the Morse law firm and Michael Morse as an individual. See Lichon v Michael Morse/Michael J. Morse, P.C. and Smits v. Michael Morse/Michael J. Morse, P.C.  Two lower court judges (one from Wayne County and one from Oakland County) had ruled the women were required to arbitrate their sexual assault claims against Michael Morse, the individual. The Michigan Court of Appeals held otherwise in a 2-1 decision Read More ›

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In 2018, Nemeth Law celebrated its 26th year in business. Our success is due to clients like you whose support we greatly appreciate. Best wishes to you and your family for a joyful and relaxing holiday season and a prosperous New Year! Read More ›

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Nemeth Law, P.C. partner, Deborah Brouwer, offers suggestions for holiday parties and best practices to keep everyone safe. Read More ›

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Do your workplace policies need to be reviewed following the passage of Proposal 1? Nemeth Law attorney Sara Moore discusses the implications of the new marijuana law on employers and offers tips for employers who may wish to revise their policies in response to the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Michigan. Read More ›

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On June 4, 2018, the United States Supreme Court decided Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Comm’n, 584 U.S. (2018).  This decision reversed a Colorado court of appeals’ ruling that a baker violated the state’s public accommodation law by refusing to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple based on religious grounds.  The Supreme Court’s narrowly crafted decision gives businesses little guidance on the interplay between public accommodation law and sincerely held religious views. Read More ›

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Summer is here. Is your workplace prepared to handle the seasonal changes in dress codes? Whether you opt for guidelines or specific rules, Nemeth Law attorney Deborah Brouwer offers tips to help employers navigate often touchy dress code issues in the summer season. Read More ›

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President Donald Trump’s focus on preventing illegal border crossings into the U.S. and deporting illegal immigrants has been widely publicized, but employers need to take note of other tactics the President’s administration is using to clamp down on illegal immigration.  The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) predicted that about 5,500 workplace investigations will be conducted this fiscal year, nearly tripling the number from the previous year.  Similarly, ICE initiated 2,282 employer audits in the first eight months of this fiscal year (October – May), which substantially exceeds the 1,360 audits performed all of last year.  ICE’s goal is to eventually open up to 15,000 audits per year.  These statistics are a warning to employers to be prepared in case of an audit.  Read More ›

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